Alcohol addiction and alcoholism are a threat to many individuals in Oklahoma, and many communities struggle with these serious issues. The need for alcohol rehab and alcohol treatment in the area has never been greater.

Alcohol treatment and alcohol rehabilitation in Oklahoma offers workable solutions to individuals that struggle with alcohol addiction and alcoholism. Trained specialists at an alcohol rehab and treatment facility in Oklahoma have had success with helping even the toughest cases, and can help individuals with all situations that arise during the recovery process. Individuals seeking alcohol treatment in Oklahoma can get to down to the bottom of how they got themselves involved in addiction and how to get out of it. With new life tools and abilities gained, they will learn how to prevent these types of situations in the future. Alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in Oklahoma offers a safe and sober environment conducive to a full recovery.

Long-term alcoholics in Oklahoma will most likely experience physical withdrawal when they suddenly quit drinking alcohol. Withdrawal symptoms are uncomfortable and even painful at times, which is one of the reasons individuals find it so hard to quit. In some cases withdrawal can be fatal. This is a prime example of why it is extremely important that individuals in Oklahoma get the help they need to get through this process. Alcohol rehab programs in Oklahoma have the tools to get you through it.

There are a variety of alcohol treatment and rehabilitation options available in Oklahoma to choose from. Treatment options include Long-term Alcohol Rehab Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehabs, Short-term Alcohol Rehabilitation Centers, Inpatient Alcohol Rehabs, support group meetings, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

Alcohol addiction and alcoholism don't have to continue to burden your life. Help is available today. Seek alcohol treatment and rehabilitation in Oklahoma, before it is too late.


Oklahoma alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004.In Oklahoma, alcohol-related deaths were highest in the first year that data collection started, which was 608 fatalities in 1982. The percentage of traffic fatalities that were alcohol related was also highest the same year, with 58%. The year with the lowest number of alcohol-related deaths recorded was 2000, with 229. The percentage of traffic fatalities that are alcohol related has steadily declined in the last twenty years to reach its lowest level in 2006, with 32%. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 33% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Oklahoma, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Oklahoma drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

The fatality rates shown below refer to the number of people killed in all traffic accidents and, separately, in alcohol related traffic accidents, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled. All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to driving under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating [a motor vehicle] while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon an Oklahoma police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

1,054

608

58

523

50

1983

848

437

52

389

46

1984

797

382

48

339

43

1985

744

353

47

301

41

1986

698

340

49

285

41

1987

597

254

43

221

37

1988

638

298

47

258

40

1989

648

284

44

257

40

1990

641

284

44

246

38

1991

652

292

45

252

39

1992

613

273

45

242

39

1993

671

284

42

245

37

1994

687

281

41

240

35

1995

669

258

39

230

34

1996

772

295

38

249

32

1997

838

328

39

291

35

1998

755

268

35

240

32

1999

741

258

35

224

30

2000

650

229

35

194

30

2001

682

270

40

234

34

2002

739

251

34

215

29

2003

668

255

38

220

33

2004

774

278

36

245

32

2005

802

283

35

249

31

2006

765

243

32

201

26

2007

754

240

32

219

29

2008

749

274

37

244

33



2003-2004 Oklahoma Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

7.42%

[33rd of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

13%

[38th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

43%

[43rd of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

3.6%

[45th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

278

[23rd of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.784 per 10,000 people

[11th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

36%

[35th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

42.59%

[43rd of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Oklahoma?

  • Non-commercial drivers in Oklahoma age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles in Oklahoma are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Oklahoma, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 in Oklahoma are legally drunk when their blood or breath contains any measurable quantity of alcohol.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Oklahoma

  • A first-time offender in Oklahoma faces 10 days to one year in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $1,000. First-time offenders are also required to participate in a substance abuse assessment and evaluation and follow all recommendations made as a result of the assessment and evaluation. The driver's license revocation period is 180 days.
  • A person who commits a second DUI in Oklahoma within 10 years of the first conviction faces one to five years in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $2,500. Second-time offenders are also required to participate in a substance abuse assessment and evaluation and follow all recommendations made as a result of the assessment and evaluation. If the second offense occurred within five years of the first offense, the driver's license revocation period is up to one year.
  • A person who commits a third DUI in Oklahoma faces one to seven years in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $5,000. Third-time offenders are also required to participate in a substance abuse assessment and evaluation and follow all recommendations made as a result of the assessment and evaluation, perform 240 hours of community service, and use an ignition interlock device. If the third offense occurred within five years of the prior offenses, the driver's license revocation period is up to three years.
  • A person who commits a fourth or subsequent offense in Oklahoma faces one to 10 years in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $10,000. Third-time offenders are also required to participate in a substance abuse assessment and evaluation and follow all recommendations made as a result of the assessment and evaluation, followed by at least one year of supervision and periodic alcohol testing, 480 hours of community service, and use of an ignition interlock device for at least 30 days. If a third or subsequent offense is committed within five years of the previous offense, the driver's license revocation period is up to three years.

Additional Punishment for Aggravated DUI

Any person who is convicted of DUI in Oklahoma with a BAC of .15 or more is guilty of aggravated DUI. A person convicted of aggravated DUI must participate in a substance abuse assessment and evaluation and comply with all recommendations for treatment. Additionally, the offender will be sentenced to at least one year of supervision and periodic alcohol testing, 480 hours of community service, and use of an ignition interlock device for at least 30 days.

Penalty for DUI that Causes Great Bodily Injury

A DUI offender in Oklahoma who causes an accident that results in great bodily injury to another person faces one to five years in prison and is subject to pay a fine up to $5,000. Under Oklahoma law, "great bodily injury" means bodily injury that creates a substantial risk of death or that causes serious, permanent disfigurement or loss or impairment of a bodily function, member, or organ.

Ignition Interlock

In addition to other penalties associated with Oklahoma's DUI laws, a person who commits a second or subsequent DUI within five years of a previous conviction is required to use an ignition interlock device after reinstatement of driving privileges for six months.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties that may apply under Oklahoma's DUI laws, a commercial driver will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for at least one year if the driver commits a DUI while driving a commercial vehicle. If, however, the driver was transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is at least three years. A commercial driver in Oklahoma who commits a second DUI while driving a commercial vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

  • For a first offens in Oklahomae, a driver under 21 is subject to one or all of the following punishments: payment of a fine of $100 to $500; completion of 20 hours of community service; completion of a treatment program.
  • Second-time offenders in Oklahoma are required to complete at least 240 hours of community service and use an ignition interlock device for at least 30 days after driving privileges are restored. Second-time offenders may also be required to pay a fine between $100 and $1,000 and complete a treatment program.
  • For a third or subsequent violation in Oklahoma, the offender is required to complete at least 480 hours of community service and use an ignition interlock device for at least 30 days after driving privileges are restored. These offenders may also be required to pay a fine of $100 to $2,000 and complete a treatment program.
  • In addition to the above penalties, a minor who commits a first DUI in Oklahoma will have his or her driver's license cancelled as ordered by a judge and will also be subject to the mandatory driver's license revocation periods applied to offenders 21 and older. A minor who commits a second or subsequent DUI will have his or her driver's license cancelled for two years or until the offender reaches 18, which period is longer. Minors who commit a second or subsequent offense are also subject to the mandatory driver's license revocation periods applied to adults.

What is Oklahoma's Dram Shop Statute?

Oklahoma's liquor laws prohibit licensed drinking establishments in Oklahoma from knowingly selling alcohol to persons under 21 and persons who are intoxicated. A violation of this law may be the basis of civil liability to collect damages against bar owners for injuries caused by an illegal sale.

Criminal Penalty for Selling Liquor to Minors and Intoxicated Persons

Licensed drinking establishments in Oklahoma that knowingly sell liquor to those under 21 are subject to a fine of $2,500 to $5,000, up to five years in prison, or both. Establishments that knowingly sell liquor to intoxicated persons are subject to a fine of $500 to $1,000, up to one year in prison, or both.

Criminal Penalty for Furnishing Liquor to Minors

Municipalities may enact ordinances that provide for fines, penalties, and imprisonment for persons who furnish liquor to minors. Municipalities have the power to enact ordinances with maximum fines of $1,200, imprisonment of up to six months, or both.

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  • Facts
  • Alcohol dependence seemingly tends to runs in families; it appears that this suggests a genetic cause; however, many things run in families that are not genetic (for example, speaking Spanish).
  • Because many people suffer from both alcohol and drug dependence, it is speculated that these problems may have common causes and risk factors.
  • An elderly driver with alcoholism is more impaired than an elderly driver without alcoholism after consuming an equivalent dose of alcohol, resulting in a greater risk of a crash.
  • The legal drinking and driving blood alcohol levels often vary from state to state throughout America, as do the consequences that are related to this often deadly offense.